All posts under nature

355/365 Silence

So what is scarce and rare? Silence. The ability to deliberately keep yourself out of the conversation and subsist without its validation. Silence is the respite of the confident and the strong. From “Ego is the Enemy: The Fight to Master Our Greatest Opponent” by Ryan Holiday

Read More »

352/365 The first principle

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself—and you are the easiest person to fool. — Richard Feynman From “Ego is the Enemy: The Fight to Master Our Greatest Opponent” by Ryan Holiday

Read More »

341/365 Just show up

“My work isn’t done tonight. My work was done 3 months ago, and I just have to show up.” From “Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers” by Timothy Ferriss

Read More »

340/365 Is that a dream?

“I’d never heard it said that way, but it stuck with me. So much so that I’ve said it to my kid now: ‘Is that a dream, or a goal? Because a dream is something you fantasize about that will probably never happen. A goal is something you set a[…]

Read More »

339/365 You know nothing

Everyone is fighting a battle you know nothing about. From “Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers” by Timothy Ferriss

Read More »

325/365 Immediate mood repair

Giving in to feel good is a big piece of the procrastination puzzle, and the Internet provides lots and lots of short-term, but specious, rewards to which we can give in to feel good. With a click or two we can leave the task that we feel bad about and[…]

Read More »

324/365 Not an excuse

Personality should not be an excuse. In fact, acknowledging and addressing our limitations can develop some of our greatest strengths. From “Solving the Procrastination Puzzle: A Concise Guide to Strategies for Change” Timothy A. Pychyl

Read More »

323/365 Just get started

When you find yourself thinking things like: “I’ll feel more like doing this tomorrow,” “I work better under pressure,” “There’s lots of time left,” “I can do this in a few hours tonight” . . . let that be a flag or signal or stimulus to indicate that you are about to needlessly[…]

Read More »

322/365 Not the most convenient way

Here are a few typical reactions that researchers have catalogued as responses to dissonance (and ways that we reduce this dissonance): Distraction—we divert our attention away from dissonant cognitions and avoid the negative affective state caused by dissonance. Forgetting—can be in two forms, passive and active. Passive is often the[…]

Read More »

319/365 The needless delay

A task done at the last minute can be excused if not done well because it was done in such a short amount of time. And, of course, if the task is done very well, it looks exceptionally good for the individual. This implies that the needless delay of a[…]

Read More »