Here is your weekly dose of photography. Hope you enjoy, feel free to send any feedback!

---

Relatively recent (2018) :) 

---
#743 An assertion of rationality

#743 An assertion of rationality

The most important of his edits was small but resounding. He crossed out, using the heavy backslashes that he often employed, the last three words of Jefferson’s phrase “We hold these truths to be sacred and undeniable” and changed them to the words now enshrined in history: “We hold these truths to be self-evident.” The idea of “self-evident” truths was one that drew less on John Locke, who was Jefferson’s favored philosopher, than on the scientific determinism espoused by Isaac Newton and on the analytic empiricism of Franklin’s close friend David Hume. In what became known as “Hume’s fork,” the great Scottish philosopher, along with Leibniz and others, had developed a theory that distinguished between synthetic truths that describe matters of fact (such as “London is bigger than Philadelphia”) and analytic truths that are self-evident by virtue of reason and definition (“The angles of a triangle equal 180 degrees”; “All bachelors are unmarried”). By using the word “sacred,” Jefferson had asserted, intentionally or not, that the principle in question—the equality of men and their endowment by their creator with inalienable rights—was an assertion of religion. Franklin’s edit turned it instead into an assertion of rationality.

From Benjamin Franklin: An American Life by Walter Isaacson

Read more.

#742 A little bit of reflection

#742 A little bit of reflection

Understanding this difference between under- and mis-regulation, a key coping strategy becomes obvious–at least it has in my own life. Instead of thinking of how awful, weak, or inadequate I am when I feel like “giving in to feel good” by breaking a nutrition plan, skipping a work out or avoiding an aversive task, I reflect on what’s really going on in my head and “heart” at that precipitous moment of choice. I feel like giving in to my craving or to avoiding the workout or task because I believe I will feel better for doing so. But the truth is, I won’t. In fact, even a little bit of reflection quickly reveals how I–particularly future me–will actually feel worse for this choice. Both personal experience and research make this clear

Read more at An Essential Self-Regulation Strategy by Dr. Timothy Pychyl at Psychology Today

Read more.

---

From the archives (2017)

---
5/365 Snow cake
---
6/365 Bird's eye snow
---
7/365 The benefits of taking a walk at 8 am
---
8/365 Crosslight
---