markg-photo-newsletter
Here is your weekly dose of photography. Hope you enjoy, feel free to send any feedback!
Relatively recent (2019) :)

#782 Behavior happens when three things come together at the same moment

#782 Behavior happens when three things come together at the same moment
Information alone does not reliably lead to sustained behavior change. Now, information can be part of the puzzle but that alone doesn’t seem to do the trick for most people. Seeing statistics, seeing data won’t necessarily change somebody’s behavior in the long term.
Behavior happens when three things come together at the same moment; motivation, ability and prompt. If you give information that specifies the behavior, well, that’s the B in the behavior model and that gives people more ability than you’ve hit, I think the most important things in changing behavior; be specific, and make it really easy to do.

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From the archives (2017)

189/365 I remind myself that I will die

189/365 I remind myself that I will die
Awareness of death is one of my main daily practices; every day, at least once a day, I remind myself that I will die and everybody I love will die. Being aware of mortality changes everything. At the very least, it puts things into proper perspective, it gives us clarity into what is really important versus what is not so important, and it therefore changes how we prioritize things in our lives.

from Joy on Demand: The Art of Discovering the Happiness Within
by Chade-Meng Tan

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188/365 That is a hero

188/365 That is a hero
“Even if you record thirty losses against a bad guy, thirty days in a row, it is still a victory, because look at you! You keep getting up and fighting again and again. You have learned to recognize that bad guy in every guise and disguise available. That is a hero.”

from SuperBetter: How a Gameful Life Can Make You Stronger, Happier, Braver and More Resilient
by Jane McGonigal

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187/365 A sense of deep enjoyment

187/365 A sense of deep enjoyment
First, the experience usually occurs when we confront tasks we have a chance of completing. Second, we must be able to concentrate on what we are doing. Third and fourth, the concentration is usually possible because the task undertaken has clear goals and provides immediate feedback. Fifth, one acts with a deep but effortless involvement that removes from awareness the worries and frustrations of everyday life. Sixth, enjoyable experiences allow people to exercise a sense of control over their actions. Seventh, concern for the self disappears, yet paradoxically the sense of self emerges stronger after the flow experience is over. Finally, the sense of the duration of time is altered; hours pass by in minutes, and minutes can stretch out to seem like hours. The combination of all these elements causes a sense of deep enjoyment that is so rewarding people feel that expending a great deal of energy is worthwhile simply to be able to feel it.

from Flow: The Psychology of Happiness
by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

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186/365 Achieving control over experience

186/365 Achieving control over experience
To overcome the anxieties and depressions of contemporary life, individuals must become independent of the social environment to the degree that they no longer respond exclusively in terms of its rewards and punishments. To achieve such autonomy, a person has to learn to provide rewards to herself. She has to develop the ability to find enjoyment and purpose regardless of external circumstances. This challenge is both easier and more difficult than it sounds: easier because the ability to do so is entirely within each person’s hands; difficult because it requires a discipline and perseverance that are relatively rare in any era, and perhaps especially in the present. And before all else, achieving control over experience requires a drastic change in attitude about what is important and what is not.

from Flow: The Psychology of Happiness
by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

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185/365 The most logical path toward sustainable happiness

185/365 The most logical path toward sustainable happiness
Interestingly, we instinctively chase after pleasure believing it to be the source of sustainable happiness. Many of us spend most of our time and energy chasing pleasure, sometimes enjoying flow, and once in a while, we think about higher purpose. Tony’s insight suggests we should be doing precisely the reverse. We should be spending most of our time and energy working on higher purpose, sometimes enjoying flow, and every now and then, savoring rock-star pleasure. This is the most logical path toward sustainable happiness, at least in relation to our work.

from Search Inside Yourself: The Unexpected Path to Achieving Success, Happiness (and World Peace)
by Chade-Meng Tan

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