markg-photo-newsletter
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Relatively recent (2019) :)

#772 Those who work much do not work hard

#772 Those who work much do not work hard
“The really efficient laborer will be found not to crowd his day with work, but will saunter to his task surrounded by a wide halo of ease and leisure. There will be a wide margin for relaxation to his day. He is only earnest to secure the kernels of time, and does not exaggerate the value of the husk. Why should the hen set all day? She can lay but one egg, and besides she will not have picked up materials for a new one. Those who work much do not work hard.”

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From the archives (2017)

139/365 Focus management

139/365 Focus management
As she continues her research, Jha finds that her definition of attention keeps evolving and expanding. “It’s a tool that can be used in many ways, and not just for selecting between relevant and irrelevant information. Where I’d like to go is to regard attention as ‘the ability to frame your field of awareness in the way that will be most useful to the task at hand.’ You could restrict or broaden your focus according to your cognitive, affective, even somatic context.”

From Rapt: Attention and the Focused Life, by Winifred Gallagher

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138/365 Happiness, a reflection of flow

138/365 Happiness, a reflection of flow
Happiness is a later reflection of the flow, rather than the result of the experience at the time

From Rapt: Attention and the Focused Life, by Winifred Gallagher

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137/365 By pleasure or pain, glory or disrepute

137/365 By pleasure or pain, glory or disrepute
Decide that you are an adult, and you are going to devote the rest of your life to making progress. Stick closely to what is best. If you are distracted by pleasure or pain, glory or disrepute, realize that the time is now. The game has started and waiting any further is not an option. Win or lose will be decided today. Use reason to meet every challenge.

From Epictetus' Enchiridion

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136/365 New, grander dreams for ourselves

136/365 New, grander dreams for ourselves
Most of us are “living the dream”—living, that is, the dream we once had for ourselves. We might be married to the person we once dreamed of marrying, have the children and job we once dreamed of having, and own the car we once dreamed of buying. But thanks to hedonic adaptation, as soon as we find ourselves living the life of our dreams, we start taking that life for granted. Instead of spending our days enjoying our good fortune, we spend them forming and pursuing new, grander dreams for ourselves. As a result, we are never satisfied with our life. Negative visualization can help us avoid this fate.

from "A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy", by William B. Irvine

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135/365 The dream we once had for ourselves

135/365 The dream we once had for ourselves
Most of us are “living the dream”—living, that is, the dream we once had for ourselves. We might be married to the person we once dreamed of marrying, have the children and job we once dreamed of having, and own the car we once dreamed of buying. But thanks to hedonic adaptation, as soon as we find ourselves living the life of our dreams, we start taking that life for granted. Instead of spending our days enjoying our good fortune, we spend them forming and pursuing new, grander dreams for ourselves. As a result, we are never satisfied with our life. Negative visualization can help us avoid this fate.

from "A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy", by William B. Irvine

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