All posts under 365Project:2017

272/365 Evidence to the contrary

The emotional mind, however, takes its beliefs to be absolutely true, and so discounts any evidence to the contrary. That is why it is so hard to reason with someone who is emotionally upset: no matter the soundness of your argument from a logical point of view, it carries no[…]

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271/365 With structure

Sometimes people ask why I bother with such a detailed level of planning. My answer is simple: it generates a massive amount of productivity. A 40 hour time-blocked work week, I estimate, produces the same amount of output as a 60+ hour work week pursued without structure. From “The Habitual[…]

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270/365 The glorious benefit of a habit

The glorious benefit of a habit is that it converts something that requires a lot of willpower and focus into something that becomes automatic and often outside of our conscious thought. We can consciously push ourselves to do a only a certain number of things every day, which means that[…]

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268/365 Life is so serious

I realize there are difficult things I need to do in this world, but I can’t do them without an inner happiness to rely on. Life is so serious that it necessitates joy and fun. I hope that makes sense. From “Joy on Demand: The Art of Discovering the Happiness[…]

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267/365 A man’s past

Fate will dole out the remainder of a man’s time as she chooses. A man’s past is forever set in stone. From “On The Shortness Of Life: De Brevitate Vitae” by Seneca

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266/365 Incomplete

There are always tasks left incomplete. The idea that you can ever reach a point where all your obligations are handled is a fantasy. From “Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World” by Cal Newport

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265/365 Huge costs

Unnecessary alerts may not cost you a ton of time, but they cost you a ton of attention: every time you receive an alert for a new email, text message, Twitter mention, or Facebook notification, your attention is instantly hijacked, and this has huge productivity costs, particularly when you’re working[…]

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264/365 Fire together, wire together

“Neurons that fire together wire together,” as psychologist Donald Hebb neatly put it back in the 1940s. The brain is plastic, constantly resculpting its circuitry as we go through our day. Whatever we are doing, as we do it our brain strengthens some circuits and not others. From “Focus: The[…]

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263/365 Divided

The problem this research identifies with this work strategy is that when you switch from some Task A to another Task B, your attention doesn’t immediately follow—a residue of your attention remains stuck thinking about the original task. This residue gets especially thick if your work on Task A was[…]

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